Our Marathon believes that no story is too small and this philosophy includes sharing social media posts. To help get you started, Our Marathon wanted to establish a little guide for finding your Facebook statuses from April 15 and April 19, 2013. 

  • From your Facebook timeline locate your annual highlights on the right-hand side of the page and select 2013
  • From your 2013 highlights, click the drop down menu and select the month of April 
  • From your April 2013 posts, scroll to April 15 (or April 19)
  • Take a screenshot of your posts. Check out Take-A-Screenshot.org for assistance on MACs and PCs
  • Create a .png, .tiff, or JPEG file and save it to your computer
  • Anonymous submissions are welcome, too! Use programs like Pixlr to redact your personal information
  • Share it with Our Marathon here

Our Marathon wants to hear from you! Did you find this useful? Do you have questions or suggestions? Contact us!

Many of the items left at the Copley Square Memorial were covered in messages and signatures. Our new Neatline exhibit takes a close look at some of the notes and signatures on a “One Boston” poster. 
This exhibit is part of our Boston City Archives Collection. 

Many of the items left at the Copley Square Memorial were covered in messages and signatures. Our new Neatline exhibit takes a close look at some of the notes and signatures on a “One Boston” poster.

This exhibit is part of our Boston City Archives Collection


Tweet from "OWSLightBrigade" (@NYCLightBrigade)

Share your tweets with Our Marathon here. 

Tweet from "OWSLightBrigade" (@NYCLightBrigade)

Share your tweets with Our Marathon here

iwanttobeakhaleesi:

thesassybestfriend:

coolchicksfromhistory:

ourmarathon:


A stark reminder of the chaos and confusion following the Marathon bombing. View more submitted text messages here. 

No story (or screenshot) is too small. Submit your own text messages, images, stories and more to our archive.

Reblogging to signal boost for those who might be interested.  Our Marathon, run by Northeastern University, is posting and collecting materials relating to the Boston Marathon Bombing.

This reminds me of the texts during shooting. This hurts my heart because I understand the fear felt in a single text.

This is scary. Although I know exactly where the bombing happened and have been there hundreds of times, I could never imagine being around that incident.

iwanttobeakhaleesi:

thesassybestfriend:

coolchicksfromhistory:

ourmarathon:

A stark reminder of the chaos and confusion following the Marathon bombing. View more submitted text messages here

No story (or screenshot) is too small. Submit your own text messages, images, stories and more to our archive.

Reblogging to signal boost for those who might be interested.  Our Marathon, run by Northeastern University, is posting and collecting materials relating to the Boston Marathon Bombing.

This reminds me of the texts during shooting. This hurts my heart because I understand the fear felt in a single text.

This is scary. Although I know exactly where the bombing happened and have been there hundreds of times, I could never imagine being around that incident.

(via measmeisallicanbe)


Northeastern Loves Boston

Share your photos, signs, and stories here. 

Northeastern Loves Boston

Share your photos, signs, and stories here

The WBUR Oral History Project: Christie Coombs

Hi! My name is Siobhan Shea, and I’m a high school student who is volunteering with the Our Marathon Digital Archive this summer. My posts for archive’s blog will primarily highlight and discuss The WBUR Oral History Project, a collection of oral histories.

I found Christie Coombs’ interview particularly moving. She tells the story of losing her husband on September 11, 2001. She talks about having to grapple with the loss of her husband while finding a way to explain the loss to her three school aged children. She states, “We went in the house and we were sitting on the couch and I was trying to explain to them what happened in simple terms that little kids could understand.”

12 years later, Christie was at the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon cheering on her daughter’s friend, who was running for Christie’s charitable foundation commemorating her husband, Jeff. Then the bombs went off. She describes the impact on her and her daughter: 

“All of the sudden I hear and see this massive explosion, and my first thought was ‘Oh my god that was a bomb.’ And then I thought to myself, ‘Well that’s not a bomb you idiot, you’re in Boston: things like that don’t happen here.’ And this all happened in split seconds. Then my next thought was of course they happen here, that happened to you…”

Listen to audio clips here or the full interview here to hear Christie’s story.  http://marathon.neu.edu/wburoralhistoryproject/christie_coombs


The One Run for Boston Relay started in CA on June 7, 2013 and finished in Boston on June 30, 2013. The relay raised over $30,000 for the One Fund. Featured here is a runner watching the baton travel across the map online!

Did you participate in the One Run for Boston? Did you run the last mile of the Marathon? Did you participate in a One Fund fundraiser? Share you stories and photos here. 

The One Run for Boston Relay started in CA on June 7, 2013 and finished in Boston on June 30, 2013. The relay raised over $30,000 for the One Fund. Featured here is a runner watching the baton travel across the map online!

Did you participate in the One Run for Boston? Did you run the last mile of the Marathon? Did you participate in a One Fund fundraiser? Share you stories and photos here


Nabila Abuljadayel shared this photo of the 2013 Boston Marathon finish line on race day morning. 

View other photos, items, and stories from the finish line here. 

Nabila Abuljadayel shared this photo of the 2013 Boston Marathon finish line on race day morning. 

View other photos, items, and stories from the finish line here


A mother submitted this photo of her son in Watertown at the end of the lockdown on April 19, 2013.

Share your photos and stories from the day of the lockdown here. 

A mother submitted this photo of her son in Watertown at the end of the lockdown on April 19, 2013.

Share your photos and stories from the day of the lockdown here

This photo was publicly submitted to our archive by stoneyquarter, along with the following reflection:

It’s taken me a year, and a revisit to Boston to be able to share my story.I think constantly of the suffering of others and I think of all of them every day, who lost loved ones, who lost limbs, who’s lives were changed forever.. I just read a story that started ” a girlfriend and I were in Sephora”.. The people with the white faces„ One of them was probably I. I live in Belfast Northern Ireland. I was in Boston to support my husband who ran the marathon.I knew immediately it was a bomb. I couldn’t understand why people lifted their iPhones when all I thought was : You need to get out of here!! It’s a bomb! I want to live to see my children again. This was the “mantra” in my head. I ran in to the Shopping Mall, to get off Boylston St. I thought of Madrid and Omagh bombings. I knew there were going to be more than one. As I took my first steps away from the street the second bomb went off right across from where I was standing. The images I struggle with still, are mothers desperately crying out to their kids in the mall “RUN RUN”. I heard people cry :There’s a shooter” and I couldn’t understand why they thought this. I don’t know if I shouted or just thought in my mind “No! There’s NO shooter, There are bombs! You need to get out, away from the mall!” I ran back to our hotel at Copley Square, coughing violently, forcing my husband to check my back for shrapnel injuries..The 2 days following were difficult. British and Northern Irish press somehow found out we were in Boston ad I found myself having to recall my experiences in the media. The images of the children with their parents, crying out, running for their lives-in the shopping mall, has never left me. I was back this year for the Marathon. My husband had to run again- to show “them” that they won’t win! That we are strong! Boston, the running community and All of USA, living in the shadow of terrorism. That day, on Boylston Street and on my return this year, I was impressed, amazed and grateful to the fantastic people of Boston and the USA for their response, reaction and support. I have never encountered anything quite like it. It has proved the resilience, strength and love that the people of Boston and U.S.A have within them. Boston and its’ people will always be in my heart.

View more public submissions here. 

This photo was publicly submitted to our archive by stoneyquarter, along with the following reflection:

It’s taken me a year, and a revisit to Boston to be able to share my story.I think constantly of the suffering of others and I think of all of them every day, who lost loved ones, who lost limbs, who’s lives were changed forever.. I just read a story that started ” a girlfriend and I were in Sephora”.. The people with the white faces„ One of them was probably I. I live in Belfast Northern Ireland. I was in Boston to support my husband who ran the marathon.I knew immediately it was a bomb. I couldn’t understand why people lifted their iPhones when all I thought was : You need to get out of here!! It’s a bomb! I want to live to see my children again. This was the “mantra” in my head. I ran in to the Shopping Mall, to get off Boylston St. I thought of Madrid and Omagh bombings. I knew there were going to be more than one. As I took my first steps away from the street the second bomb went off right across from where I was standing. The images I struggle with still, are mothers desperately crying out to their kids in the mall “RUN RUN”. I heard people cry :There’s a shooter” and I couldn’t understand why they thought this. I don’t know if I shouted or just thought in my mind “No! There’s NO shooter, There are bombs! You need to get out, away from the mall!” I ran back to our hotel at Copley Square, coughing violently, forcing my husband to check my back for shrapnel injuries..The 2 days following were difficult. British and Northern Irish press somehow found out we were in Boston ad I found myself having to recall my experiences in the media. The images of the children with their parents, crying out, running for their lives-in the shopping mall, has never left me. I was back this year for the Marathon. My husband had to run again- to show “them” that they won’t win! That we are strong! Boston, the running community and All of USA, living in the shadow of terrorism. That day, on Boylston Street and on my return this year, I was impressed, amazed and grateful to the fantastic people of Boston and the USA for their response, reaction and support. I have never encountered anything quite like it. It has proved the resilience, strength and love that the people of Boston and U.S.A have within them. Boston and its’ people will always be in my heart.
View more public submissions here